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For the Love of Parenting


Has anyone felt the struggle and tention in a relationship when you have your first child? It brings a lot of pressure to the table; begs for a lot of understanding from both sides.

Some relationships really struggle – like mine. My husband was left feeling like he couldn’t do much. He started feeling left out because the attention was all on our baby.

Eventually we started trying to be able to make more time for each other but as parents know that’s pretty hard to do. When you do get an hour to yourself we’re often left feeling exhausted and tired. You have to muster up all the remaining energy to give to your partner even knowing that doing so instead of caring for yourself will in turn make the next day harder. Because you know your baby’s going to be up throughout the night.

Tensions rise as do emotions. Reactions are exaggerated by lack of sleep and mental drain.

Often the mom ends up being the one to spend the majority of the time with the baby while the dad is away working throughout the day. So naturally the mom knows things and learns things that take more time for the dad to learn. Naturally the mom will speak up if something’s not being done quite right and then the dad is left feeling like he’s doing things wrong. Which adds to the tension. As the child grows slowly parents get their independence back.

Around the age of 2 the child is probably sleeping a little better, for longer stretches. The family can go out and do things that they couldn’t do when they just had a little baby.
You can stay up at night and have a couple drinks with friends with a monitor nearby to keep an ear on a child sleeping.

You start to ReDiscover who you are now as a parent.

In a lot of families this is when parents can start to reconnect with each other and rebuild their relationship; but in other’s it is when relationships can start to struggle more and the feelings of unresolved issues in the beginning of Parenthood are left festering while emerging Independence is dangled in front of you like a carrot.

Actions and desires can get misinterpreted. It’s hard when as parents you want to do everything that’s best for your child. Most know that a tense relationship between parents is not healthy for a child so the parents push themselves to find balance.

Sometimes though, the end goal makes us lose the feeling of being heard because you’re more focussed on trying to fix things than understand them.

Parenting kids, Seriously, Voice boxing it

The Signs Your Child Is Feeling Out Of Touch With You


There are 4 main signs your child can be expressing when they are feeling out of touch, and 4 main signs that you may be doing as a prarent that can be contributing to the way your child feels – it can be any one of these signs for child and parent; it doesn’t need to be all the signs.

• They’re more irritable
• They’re more aggressive/rough
• They’re listening less than usual
• They’re more clingy or doing things to get your attention
• You’ve noticed you’ve had to tell them ‘not right now’ more frequently
• You’ve been more focused on your own checklist lately i.e., cleaning, organizing, phone calls
• You’ve been on your phone multiple times when they are trying to get your attention
• You have had less one on one time with your child lately

The signs expressed by kids of any age when they’re feeling out of touch also copy the signs of many other things that can being on; such as

• Growth spurts
• Sleeping regressions
• Lack of sleep
• Hungry
• Teething
• Illness/injury

It is important when kids are expressing any behaviour out of norm that you reflect on what’s been going on in their life AS WELL AS yours.

If kids are feeling as if their emotional and attachment needs are not being met, less fullfilled than usual, or that their weekly schedule is going off track – most do not understand how to verbalize this, or feel comfortable doing so.

So what can we as parents do? Even though we may feel like we aren’t doing anything different, your child feels differently. It is important not to decline their feelings or their reality, and to make them feel heard.

• Help them name their emotions they are feeling – so that both your child and you understand
• Try to make room in your day for more one on one time
• Challenge yourself to an hour without your phone – put it down and out of sight. Interact and play with your child, be more hands on, and share some cuddles
• Get your child more involved with YOUR world. Have them help you in the kitchen i.e., measuring, mixing, getting ingredients, setting the table. Have them help you clean and organize, or help outside with gardening or yard clean up. The goal isn’t to get them doing CHORES, but for you to do these things TOGETHER. If you have an older child whom isn’t interested in a chore-related activity – offer to do a trade: you do an activity of ‘your world’ together, and then you do an activity of ‘their world’ together

Voice boxing it

When You Get Shunned For Being A Child And Family Relations Advocate


When you’re hated for being an advocate for children.

For standing up for mental health. For standing up against poor parenting. For trying to educate parents and grown children the repercussions of certain parenting choices, past and present.

I can’t help you if you think I make you feel like a shitty parent;
But I can help you if you think you want to be a better parent, or if you think I make you feel like you can always strive to be better.

Wanting to strive to be better doesn’t make you a bad parent. Thinking there’s areas you could improve on does not make you a failure. Admitting you have made mistakes does not make you weak.

What concerns me is when parents think their actions or behaviour doesn’t matter. When parents live off the phrase “they’ll be fine” to excuse situations they could have handled better.

I will never stop striving to advocate for children and better family relationships. Everyone on this planet was once a child, and everyone who is parenting was once parented. It is a circle. In understanding children, you understand yourself as a child. In understanding parenting, you understand your child.

Whoever you are today, whatever your strengths, whatever your weaknesses, has been shaped by your childhood. Whatever events and situations you experienced, whatever hardships you endured, your perception and interpretation of them all – during and after – came from how you were shaped as a child. However you were shaped as child came from how your parents/caregivers interacted with you.

If you find yourself or someone you know taking offense to these things, to advocating and educating, maybe that’s a sign of unresolved issues needing to be handled instead of suppressed.

Knowledge is power folks.